Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Wellness In a Nutshell: The Elevator Pitch

Some can describe what they do in just one word: teacher, doctor, plumber. Everyone knows what a plumber does -- but a corporate wellness provider? That usually requires explanation, and if you're meeting someone for the first time, it's easy to get tongue-tied.

Kevin Daum, writing for Inc., describes the three musts of a good "elevator pitch":
  • Connect with empathy
  • Offer an objective solution
  • Provide differentiation
Even if you're not in sales, you'll probably have to describe what corporate wellness is and why it works. Daum's formula makes it a snap. Here's my version:

You know how some employees never utter a kind word about the company they work for? They're like Old Faithful, spewing negativity loudly and often. We call these people "disengaged," and they're a serious problem for companies today. They're unproductive, and they erode the morale of everyone around them. To fight this trend, companies need some way to communicate the opposite message -- "We care about our employees!" -- loud and clear. Wellness programs do that by offering services that have a direct positive impact on employees' lives: biometric screenings, health coaching, and educational opportunities. It's a benefit employees truly appreciate.

So what's your wellness elevator speech? How do you explain what employee wellness is and why it's important?

1 comment:

Gregory Ross Miller said...

The success of a company is based on the health and wellness of its employees. That is why corporate wellness programs are important. In order for America to continue to meet the quality and high standards associated with superior performance in the work place, wellness programs should be incorporated into corporate work agendas nationwide. Wellness Corporate Solutions is a shining example of such a program. Kudos to Fiona and Judith and the entire team at WCS.